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Let's Stagger Hays CC3's Dockets

 

Can changing the procedures in Hays County Court at Law #3 make attorneys' lives less stressful? How about staggering the dockets?

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This is a photo of the Hays County Government Center on a Thursday morning, where the closest available parking spot is down the road a bit.


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Many courts around Texas have implemented staggered dockets with positive results. Instead of setting every case on one or two days of the week at 8:30am (so that everyone is getting to the courthouse at the same time), staggering the dockets involves adding other days and times from which the attorneys choose, to alleviate crowding in the courthouse and sooth parking headaches.

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Most attorneys practice in more than one county. Giving the attorneys the option of either a morning or afternoon docket on many different days during the week allows them to schedule their cases in different counties without rushing between clients that can be many miles apart.

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Attorneys have stressful jobs. Some days they feel like they're getting hit from all sides. It is stressful when judges' offices call asking why they're late and clients are upset about being kept waiting. Many attorneys are sole practitioners, and while they're practicing law, they are also frequently their own secretaries, filing clerks, and paralegals.

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Staggering the dockets and adding afternoon dockets can alleviate some of the pressure on attorneys and give clients more options to accommodate their work schedules.

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If elected, I will be on the bench when the courthouse opens each morning (barring some sort of disaster or continuing legal education commitment). I will have regular morning uncontested dockets for civil litigants and to address bond issues. During misdemeanor dockets, I will be on the bench to hear motions and pleas as they become ready, rather than forcing attorneys to wait for me. I will have pre-printed forms for routine motions and plea bargains so that defense attorneys can fill out their own paperwork to reduce the workload on the prosecutors.

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Simple procedural changes can save attorneys' time and clients' money.

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My name is Millie Thompson. I grew up in a mobile home in the neighborhood called Green Pastures in Kyle, Texas. After moving to Austin for high school at John H. Reagan H.S., I went on to study Anthropology and Sociology at Texas A&M University. After getting my B.A., I completed the course work and passed the comprehensive exams for a M.A. (no degree taken) at the University of Houston in Cultural Anthropology with a graduate certificate in Women’s Studies. Instead of completing my M.A., I decided to go to law school. I did not want to be an academic. I wanted to actually help people, not just study them. I graduated from South Texas College of Law in Houston, and I have been practicing law since 2010. I run my own law practice with offices in Dripping Springs and Austin. My husband and I live in Dripping Springs.

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I have had the honor and privilege of representing Texans across our state in every type of case that is filed in Hays CC3. In addition, I have represented people in Civil Rights lawsuits in federal court. Through my Civil Rights work, I have delved deeply into Constitutional law, litigating First Amendment and Due Process issues.

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My educational background in the social sciences, knowledge of Constitutional law, and experience handling cases across Texas combine so that I have a long list of right and wrong ways to organize a court to ensure the fairest possible procedures. Hays County will continue to experience a population increase indefinitely into the future. The courts will continue to add more cases. I am asking for your vote so that I can get to work modernizing Hays CC3’s procedures to ensure that they are fair and efficient.

#MillieForHaysCC3


Pol. Ad. Paid for by Millie Thompson Campaign, in compliance with the voluntary limits of the Judicial Campaign Fairness Act. Thomas Nevill, Treasurer.
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